Car, Leger painting up for grabs at second YSL auction

By AFP

June 18, 2010 Updated Aug 10, 2009 at 9:11 AM EDT

A Fernand Leger painting and Yves Saint Laurent's own Mercedes Benz and Hermes luggage are to go on sale in November in a second smaller auction of the YSL-Pierre Berge collection, one of the world's great private collections.

Far smaller than the record-smashing 700-item February sale, which fetched 342.5 million euros (491.9 million dollars), the 1,200 works to come under the hammer from November 17 to 19 are estimated at between three and four million euros, Christie's said Monday.

Like the first sale, which was the biggest private art sale in history, the proceeds will go to HIV research and the fight against AIDS, said the auctioneers who are organising the three-day sale in conjunction with Berge's own auction house.

Works to be auctioned are largely from the pair's country hideaway on the Normandy coast, a three-storey building with a sea view built in 1874 which the pair redecorated to evoke Marcel Proust's "In Search of Lost Time."

But the most expensive piece, a 1950 Fernand Leger estimated at between 80,000 and 120,000 euros, is from the Paris home of Saint Laurent, who died aged 71 in June last year.

Other mementoes from the king of couture include his 2007 Mercedes Benz for 30,000 to 50,000 euros, three Hermes suitcases in crocodile leather at 4,000 to 6,000 euros and 10 of his signature jewels kept in his bedroom, from 800 euros each.




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