Local Man Asks for Support Fighting Gas Prices

By Rachel Martin

June 13, 2012 Updated Oct 18, 2013 at 3:49 PM EDT

CHURUBUSCO, Ind. (Indiana’s NewsCenter) – The war on gas prices continues as gas rose nearly 40 cents from June 5 to June 13. A former global sourcing manager says he’s had enough and decided to take matters into his owns hands.

Roger Bayford of Churubusco was so fed-up, he contacted Congressman Marlin Stutzman, Senator Richard Lugar, and State Attorney General Greg Zoeller looking for answers.
What he got—virtually nothing. Atty. General Zoeller’s and Stutzman’s offices sent emails acknowledging they received Bayford’s letter. Sen. Lugar’s office sent him a five-page form letter outlining his three-year-old energy policy.

“[I’m] Very disappointed in all our elected officials and if this is the best they can do, I suggest they all resign,” Bayford said. “If I, as an ordinary citizen, have knowledge to find this with their massive staffs and the massive amounts of money they spend, can’t they find it? Can’t they figure out what’s going on? I think I know.”

Bayford says he thinks rising gas prices have nothing to do with international crude oil prices. According to research he obtained and constructed into graphs from the New York Mercantile, crude oil prices dropped from $107.30 on May 9 to $81.80 on June 11. Retail prices on unleaded gas also dropped. On May 9 a gallon of unleaded gas was $3.89 and dropped to $3.47 June 3. However, it rose by nearly 20 cents by June 11 to $3.85. Bayford says he blames to local economy.

“You can see crude has dropped by 25 percent. The unleaded gasoline prices have dropped by 16 percent. Our retail price has dropped by 1 percent,” said Bayford. “Some of that's going to be the wholesaler, some of that's going to be the gas station, but that's certainly not a five cent mark-up which they've always said they've been holding. Hogwash!

“It’s being rigged locally—the wholesalers and the gas stations, to a certain extent, are also participating because they’re making extra money,” continued Bayford.

On Wednesday in Northeast Indiana the average price for an unleaded gallon of gas is between $3.80 and $3.85. Tuesday's average was $3.56. Between a quarter and 30 cents may not seem like a lot to some people, but for others it makes a big difference to their pocket books.

“There are some friends of mine who have hit on hard times because of the harsh economics in the U.S. that actually struggle. Every dollar you take out of their pocket for extra gasoline that’s money that’s not going into the economy.”

According to GasBuddy.com, n the east coast, like in Columbia, S.C. the average gas price fell to $3.06 or lower. The average price in the Midwest is $3.80, although it's still not as bad as the west cost, where it’s $4.69 in Los Angeles. But for its region, Indiana’s average is middle of the road compared to Michigan’s high of $3.85 and Kentucky's low of $3.43

Bayford says he’s called Atty. General Zoeller’s office several times, written a letter, and even had an editorial published in the local newspaper urging citizens to call and complaine. But he says he can’t fight rising gas prices alone.

“With just me writing it won't do it. It's going to take everybody saying hey, what is going on? Attorney General's office get off your duff and do something, find out, and stop it! Because the numbers don't lie. They're there.”

Bayford was kind enough to give INC News copies of all his letter and graphs. To take a look click on "Bayford's" under News Links on our homepage.




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