State Board of Education Member Discusses Common Core

By Eric Dutkiewicz - 21Alive

Credit: Nolan Broxton - 21Alive

State Board of Education Member Discusses Common Core

February 11, 2014 Updated Feb 11, 2014 at 9:57 PM EDT

WATERLOO, Ind. (21Alive) - As the Indiana State Board of Education evaluate common core state standards, a discussion was held Tuesday night on what may go into those standards in the Hoosier State.

Brad Oliver, Ed.D, board member and associate dean at Indiana Wesleyan University, addressed the crowd at DeKalb Middle School to explain the ongoing process to adopt college and career-ready standards by July 1.

The premise of the new standards, Oliver says, is to alleviate the need for remediation from first-year college students and to better prepare those moving straight to the workforce after high school.

The Indiana General Assembly slowed the implentation of common core standards adopted in 2010. Panels are being created among education experts, classroom teachers and parents across the state to draft new standards, Oliver says.

"They (state lawmakers) asked us to go back," he says. "One of those is to retain Indiana's sovereignty as a state, and make sure we adopt our own standards. Secondary to that, to make sure we have the best college and career-ready standards."

Those panels are slated to share results and ideas at meetings Thursday and Friday.

The reconciliation meetings will allow the panels to start drafting a new set of standards.

Three public hearings will also be held later this month seeking more input from Hoosiers.




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