Courtroom Dress Code: Grant County Tells Visitors To Keep It Covered

By Jeff Neumeyer

June 5, 2012 Updated Jun 5, 2012 at 6:43 PM EDT

MARION, Ind. (Indiana's NewsCenter) --- Pajamas, slippers and short shorts are no longer allowed.

The court system in Grant County has instituted a new dress code for spectators, witnesses and jurors.

It’s something that has been building over time, but apparently a specific episode had a lot to do with the policy change.

Superior Court Judge Dana Kenworthy says the last straw was a woman who came in wearing ultra “short shorts” for the benefit of her inmate boyfriend.

The dress code was put in force about two weeks ago.

Among the items of clothing now off limits: micro-mini skirts, see-through clothing or low cut tops, but also muscle shirts, most kinds of hats, as well as pajamas and slippers.

Judge Kenworthy says the trend has been for people to push the envelope.

Judge Dana Kenworthy/Grant County Superior Ct. 2: " When I looked at dress codes from across the nation, some were very restrictive. In some places, people have to show up in long pants, socks, shoes, belt, shirt tucked in, what I would call business attire. Our thought was, we're not asking people to dress fancy, we just want them to be covered and appropriate."

Judge Kenworthy says the courts can cut some extra slack to jurors or witnesses, if sending them home to change clothes would cause a troublesome delay in court proceedings.

Regardless, the message is now clear, not everything goes anymore in the Grant County courts.




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